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morning sunday at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. >> now a discussion and facial recognition technology and privacy issues. after that, oregon senator ron wyden talks about global issues with the internet. and then south carolina governor immediately. -- nikki haley. not a discussion on facial recognition technology and the privacy issues that arise as it becomes more widespread this is about one hour 20 minutes. >> i am technology reporter for political. i have a great panel so i will not bore you with an introduction. to start us off we have the ftc commissioner who was sworn in on a term that expires in 2018. she focuses on fcc issues, including privacy. she served at the commission for -- she focuses on f.t.c. issues, including privacy. she would get us started off with a recap on what the ftc is working on. >> i am delighted for the opportunity to provide some into the three stocks on the topic of this panel, facial recognition technology. i will be speaking from the perspective of consumers. the mission is to prevent business practices that are anti-competitive, deceptive, or on f
with our immigration system. that technology world sees that people have gotten their phd from schools like mit. if you are a farmer, you would say that the migrant farmers do not have their papers. if you are checking crowdabs in maryland, the season be destroyed because you do not have workers. below thing is a mess. i have hope that -- the whole thing is a mess. >> you represent a lot of companies in silicon valley. what are you hearing from them? what is the solution to these problems? >> at it not so much a h-1 visa problem. i'm not saying it should be repealed, but it has structural problems. the real answer is residents. if you have some hot shot that got his phd in computer science from stanford, he's getting offers from all over the world. if you make them stay in limbo for six years, that's not really competitive. we want people to stay here and create jobs. that does not just in the tech field, but throughout the economy. make it easy for people to stay and grow american jobs to help our economy recover. >> what is the atmosphere for potential immigration reform in congress? >> w
of the technology sector. certainly start of companies can be from the person that decides it wants to open a dry cleaners to the latest in technology that originates and we see here at this trade show. where the greatest success seem to be was in the innovation arena, that technology arena, and it appeared to me that government was about to make a decision that was going to limit the opportunity that innovation would have for the economy. and did not expect to have much success, the allies, they were on the other side of the issue. significant players, both in congress and outside. if he was in the room, i would give him full credit for the success. the reality as it was the community the decided they were going to participate in making their position known and felt in washington, d.c. as a result, what was unexpected became the outcome, the unexpected outcome of stopping sopa and pipa was the success we had as a result of citizen participation. i hope that at victory is felt that democracy is still alive and well. a person's. of you can be heard and make a difference. that outcome was the expec
and increased expectations about what health information technology can do now -- i think it is a challenge always to balance the technology that can do these things -- we know you don't get paid to do these things but we wanted to do them -- and how those broader dynamics moved down the path and stay connected and yet balance in real time. i think that is a challenge. from the consumer viewpoint and what we know is that consumers want thatit. we did a survey about a year ago and there was broad consumer support for physicians use of electronic of records. i think it has the potential to be a game changer for them. their expectations are now beginning to change, too, in this transition phase. we saw that only a fairly small percentage of consumers have on- line access to their medical records. it is about 26% of people who also had said in ehr. for those that did, their views were very different and their experiences were very different. there were more engaged in their care and more motivated to do something to improve their care and they felt more confident in their clinician's ability to
and most prominent advocates of science, technology, and engineering, math and education, some of you know them as a member of the school state board. later this week president obama will be awarding him the national medal of science for his achievement in physics. dr. james gates. [applause] two years ago, and that just two years ago, this woman has turned around a workplace into a full-time job. please welcome janice in caroline county and melissa jones harris. [applause] within the heart of every individual is a spirit and a dignity that yearns to be recognized. 12 months ago outside, the officially recognized for the first time in 380 years, the people in a ceremony that none of us will soon forget. please welcome the tribe. [applause] thank you for being here. we're also joined by someone who found himself doing the job of a city manager. when his own home was flooded, he set aside his personal needs an extended her day and night to help the families in the cities through the crisis. mayor p.j. mayor? [applause] my fellow marylanders, the story of dr. gates, the story of janice and me
. >> the science, space and technology committee will come to order. i'll recognize myself for an opening statement and the ranking member for her opening statement. the topic of today's hearing, the first of this committee and this congress, is american competitiveness. the role of research and development. this is an appropriate hearing because much of the jurisdiction of this committee relates to keeping america globally competitive. america's ability to compete depends on whether we have the present vision to conduct the science that will define the future. as the wall behind me says, where there is no vision, the people perish. this committee's goal and today's hearing is to help define that vision and ensure that america continues to be the leader of global innovation. our first hearing today will will begin this process by examining the positive impact of today's r&d and looking forward to potential breakthrough innovations in the future. americans have always been innovators and explorers. our ancestors crossed oceans, opened fronttears and ventured to explore a new content and even travel
out how we advanced to the next stage, how we build out these clean technologies and diverse technologies that will allow us to do your choices. more and do it in a clean and environmentally responsible way. raising our energy costs, imposing the mandates, other heavy handed ideas but are out there for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, they will not pass. we have tried it once. so, what we need to be doing as we move forward, rulemaking efforts, as we know, which will try to take things in a direction that i would disagree with. we need to find ways to develop those technologies that allow us to have that greater environmental responsibility. so, we need to develop the resources that we have today. we do it domestically, cut our dependence, taking a portion of that revenue and specifically dedicating it in it to the energy solutions of tomorrow. we talk about our energy funds and how they would build out and truly help us advance. that is kind of the framework. it is good reading. it is thoughtful reading and it is designed to advance the discussion on critically important t
. here are companies and are doing it attractively. as the technology matures, i hope these guidelines will be more widespread. facial recognition not technician, i hope will be increasingly used because it will be profitable. >> i want to thank everybody for coming. we have to cut his panel shut. there are hours of conversation. we have more coming up. thank you. [applause] >> senator ron wyden has been a digital don quix and toot overe night millions came to his rescue. a digital don quixote. >> what an inflationary introduction. i did not know if he was having his campaign -- caffeine or what. it would be cruel and unusual punishment to give you a big filibuster at 9:00 in the morning. if you are trying to get a little red bull inn to you or something to get started, i thought i might turn the old phrase about vegas on its head. we all know that the classic description of they this is that what happens in his stays in vegas. with the great work that might and everyone has done, we should say that the innovation that is demonstrated in las vegas means to be disseminated around the wo
of technology in the southern part of the district. home of microsoft and a lot of biomedical device companies and rich agricultural industry of dairies and specialty crops. emigration is important from many different aspects. you talked -- we talked about h1b minute talk about a starter visa program. would you talk about how that would work in conjunction with the program? >> the starter visa would do wonderful -- wonders for seattle and new york and more for silicon valley. there are tens of thousands of companies that would be started almost overnight if we gave the entrepreneurs the ability to do that. it can start a company but you cannot work for a period that is brain dead. we would have a boom in entrepreneurship but we have not seen before. it should be done independently of everything else we're doing. just get that done so we can fix the immediate problem. there is the issue of hab's. -- h1b's. there are debates about whether they take jobs away. and in other parts you do need h1b's. the more urgent thing is to give green cards to the millions who are already here. let them start th
figures out how we advanced to that next stage, how we build out these technologies, clean technologies and diverse technologies that allow us to do more and do it in no way that is an environmentally responsible way. imposing the mandates of other heavy hand of ideas that are out there for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. they are not going to pass congress. what we need to be dealing, as we move forward, there will be rolled-making efforts. -- rule-making efforts. need to find those ways that we develop the technologies to really allow us to have that greater environmental responsibility. we need to develop resources that we have today, do it domestically so we cut our dependence on opec. take a portion of that revenue and we specifically dedicate it to the energy solutions of tomorrow. we talk about the energy deployment fund and how it will build out and advance. that is the framework. it is good reading and it is designed to advance the discussion on a critically important topic. . do see a lot of new changes happening to the new administration. how could we summarize those chang
, receptionists, not things where your skills get stale because of advances in technology there are plenty of all unemployed workers that work and technology fields or feel for the technology continues to develop. sometimes they spend that time keeping up with their skills. most people who are computer professionals are people love to be on the computer and love to learn the new thing. even if they are not working and i have spoken to many workers, they are learning new programs out there and learning new technology on their own because that's just what they do. the way i would read a book for pleasure, they will get on a computer and learn something new because that's what they enjoy doing. there is this assumption among some employers that skills are getting stale but there is no looking at the resume for speaking to a qualified individual if that is true. host: the federal level made an effort on this action as well. this was the federal fair employment opportunity act of 2011. it would make it illegal for employers to discriminate against the unemployed, job applicants could sue and recover d
and border patrol and technology. "washington journal" is next. ♪ host: congress returns today, part of the agenda includes consideration of a bill requiring the white house to produce a balanced budget. the story today from "the washington times" airlines readers that the budget act requires the president to put out a budget by the first monday of february. senator harry reid said the gun legislation in the senate will include magazine size and background checks, but it would not seek a ban on military-style assault weapons. an amendment could be included to cover that. the president heads to minneapolis to discuss gun control. and the cost of the 2012 elections are in. the final price tag is estimated at $7 billion. according to the consumer confidence index, half the respondents said that the financial crisis went under the labour retirement plan. we are interested in hearing from you if the financial crisis delay your retirement. want to give us a call, the numbers are on your screen. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. if y
, and there have also been technology advancements in places like iraq and afghanistan, where we can surveil the orders. it gets as hot as 130 degrees, and that is hard on people, so we have really got to do the technology side of this thing, which, by the way, the israelis have been able to do, and i am confident we can make that progress to assure our citizens that their lives are secure. we are in a secure building. in southern arizona every night, they have drug people going across their property. they deserve security. we can achieve that, and we are on the road to doing that. >> members going with you. what will you see? what will you see when you go to the border? >> first of all, they can see the vastness. the second thing they can see is the improvements that have been made. third, things that still need to be done. talking to the men and women on the ground, ones that are out there every day, literally risking their lives, there is nothing like having eyeballs on the issue to really get a good understanding. >> yesterday was the sixth meeting of the gang. >> yes, but we hate the wo
of their participation in the program. please do support an expansion of that program. [applause] technology has pushed montana into a global marketplace, but far too many of our schools are lagging behind. the phones in our pockets have better internet access than many of the classrooms in our state. that's why i also support further investing in our schools, and using state resources to help school districts modernize and acquire today's technology. we can and we will work together to invest in and improve our public schools. in making even modest investments in early childhood education and technology improvements for our schools, i am asking that you look beyond the immediate, beyond this session or even the length of time you and i will be entrusted with serving the public. it isn't always easy investing now for later returns, but that's what leaders do. i'm asking you to look beyond the immediate in other areas, too, including transforming the way we deliver healthcare, so we can create jobs and take care of those who need our help the most. to have a healthy economy, we need healthy citizens. fo
today talks about immigration and home laws as well as border patrols, strategy and technology. "washington journal" live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> at age 65 she was the oldest first lady when her husband became president but never set foot in washington. her husband, benjamin harrison, died just one month after his inauguration. meet anna harrison and other women who served as first lady over 44 administrations in c-span's new original series, first ladies, influence and image. their public and private lives, interests and influence on the president. introduced with the white house historical association, season one begins february 19, on c-span, c-span radio and c-span dot oregon on february 18. >> british prime minister david cameron was in algeria wednesday for talks concerning the recent hostage situation that left six brittons dead and made a surprise visit to libya. he took questions from the british house of commons in his weekly question time session which topics included state of the economy, housing benefits for veterans and a proposed tax increase on beer a
or blackberry to understand the application of technology and what makes it work and what doesn't make it work. >> is very difficult to make investment decisions and expect any kind of return on investment and have no way to predict the future. our difficulty right now is that there is no consistency or certainty in our policy decisions. >> of the government's role in technology and policy from this technology show. >> this week on "q&a" -- mark shields discusses his early career in politics and his transition to journalism. >> mark shields -- can you remember the first time you did work in front of an audience
decisions. >> the government role in technology and policy from this years ces international consumer electronics show. under night at eight o'clock eastern on c-span two. >> british prime minister david cameron was in algeria wednesday for talks concerning the recent hostage situation that left six britons dead and made a surprise visit to libya. he took questions from the british house of commons in his weekly question time session which topics included state of the economy, housing benefits for veterans and a proposed tax increase on beer and alcohol. this is 35 minutes. dispersed so they can go to the projects so desperately needed. >> order. questions to the prime minister. >> number one, mr. speaker. >> thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others, and in addition to my duties in the cells i shall have further such meetings later today. >> thank you, mr. speaker. is it right that a mother and my contingency may not -- confirmed by his minister, her son serving in her majesty's armed forces -- [inaudible] >> the reforms t
to produce carbon-producing technologies in the future. we are giving away our future. the president said future generations will look at the whole question as a moral one. we cannot ignore tha problem as serious as this. we have had cataclysmic storms and hurricanes and drought and fires. congress has spent billions and billions of dollars to try to help the areas that have become victims. what we have seen is a small example of what we will see. if we go forward, it will not eliminate problem. it will still take a lot to mitigate a lot of the damage because of the excess cause of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. >> louisiana, a republican column. >> congressman. i hope you will give me a minute or two to reel off a couple of facts about global warming. we have had 16 years with no warning whatsoever. sandy was not a hurricane when it made landfall. the drought reporter said the drop was less likely climate change. in great britain, a report was released law when warming predictions. james, a member, he just recently lowered his expectations. i would hope the facts will come out. more
with new technologies and improving technologies has provided what now appears to be a surplus of oil and gas in this country. we're looking for ways to export natural gas. when i first came to congress, some of the big hearings 10 years ago were about what are we going to do, we have run out of natural gas? the farmers and the chemists were concerned. we wanted to bring liquefied natural gas from other countries. now we're looking at ways to get that on the world market and perhaps reduce our trade deficit. that's a good story. if the president wants to talk about that, i'm happy to listen. host: republicans have said if we are going to avoid the across-the-board spending cuts, we need a long-term deal on entitlement reform. where would you and how would you change medicare? guest: those two statements are not related. the sequester will happen. entitlement reform was left out of the last sequester equation. there will be other budgetary cuts down the road. those must affect -- 10,000 people a day joining the ranks of medicare. the advance and complexity, what we're able to do in med
significant improvements. there are more improvements to be made, particularly in the area of technology that has been developed in iraq and afghanistan, in ability to surveil and apprehend, whether we are talking about drones or satellites. in a few months, down on the arizona border, the temperature will be 120 degrees. it is hard on people. it is hard for people to remain efficient during those conditions. the more technology and surveillance capacity you have, the less wear and tear on these brave men and women patrolling our border. we can do that. but it is coined to take a while. [indiscernible] [laughter] >> did you hear senator mccain said he was so sorry you got reelected? one thing i wanted to finish up with is, we are here talking about manufacturing's next chapter. there seems to be a new spring in the step of talking about manufacturing, that there are new technological breakthroughs happening. there are a lot of problems. the last 10, 15 years, i cannot remember manufacturing conferences that were not more doom and gloom. the you get the sense we are turning a corner in th
. the united states is in the middle of another reinventing right now. technology is changing and giving them that at its edge back. let's start with manufacturing. i will give you a crash course. just like we saw oil doing something we worried about, now you have newspapers writing about saudi america. fracking change our entire perspective of oil. look at competing. five years ago, none of you would ever used a smart phone. practically, all of us do that. we carry in our pockets more computing power than existed the day we were born. it's it's in our pockets waiting for us to check e-mails. the same thing is happening in manufacturing. look at the advances in the robotics, artificial intelligence. china's manufacturing industry will be toast. it will start coming back to america like we never imagined before. we have the debate about health care. health care is advancing like you cannot imagine. between digital medicine, major advances are happening. i am a heart patient. my iphone case is an ekg machine. i can mail that to my cardiologists. the way technology is going, i will not need a ca
come to be professional high-technology people. we have to work out workable plans in that area. that deals with the entire economy. it is an economic issue. it is not a political issue. hopefully if we get it done we get people employees. it will make dealing with the immigration issue a lot easier. >> what percentage do you put at success for this by the end of the year? >> i think there is a good chance of success it the secure border issue is well taken care of. that there is a fast rule that the pap way to citizenship will only kick in when we do not let anyone come into the country except with papers. >> thank you. >> we have been listening to this for 30 years about tightening the border. will you ever felt confident enough to say the border is secure? >> right now the answer is no. let's see what this legislation does. it has to be a keystone of this legislation or the whole arch will throw -- fall through. >> budget increases, everything, you know that border. it is thousands of miles long. it is porous. you could see a point or you could say i'm confident the border wi
to wait years. if you are a foreign student who was to pursue a career in science or technology, or a foreign entrepreneur that wants to start a business with the backing of american investors, we should help you do that here. because if you succeed, you will create american businesses and american jobs. you will help us grow our economy, strengthen our middle- class. so that is what comprehensive immigration reform looks like. smarter enforcement, at a pathway to earn citizenship, improvements in the legal immigration system so that we continue to be a magnet for the best and brightest all around the world. it is pretty straightforward. the question now is simple. do we have the result -- resolve as a people, as a country, as a government, to finally put this behind us? i believe that we do. [applause] i believe that we do. [applause] i believe we are finally at the moment where comprehensive immigration reform is within our grasp. but i promise you this, the closer we get, the more emotional this debate will become. immigration has always been an issue that inflames passions.
of their economies rather than their militaries and political and technological changes are empowering non-state actors like activists, corporations and terrorist networks. at the same time, we face challenges from financial contagion to climate change to human and wildlife trafficking that's still across borders and defy unilateral solutions. as president obama has said, the old post-war architecture is crumbling under the weight of new threats, so the geometry of global power has become more distributed and diffuse as the challenges we face have become more complex and cross-cutting. so the question we ask ourselves every day is what does this mean for america? and then we go on to say, how can we advance our own interests and also uphold a just, rules-based international order, a system that does provide clear rules of the road for everything from intellectual property rights to freedom of navigation to fair labor standards. simply put, we have to be smart about how we use our power, not because we have less of it. indeed, the might of our military, the size of our economy, the influenc
.i.a.'s drift toward becoming a paramilitary organization and put it back on course. for all the technological advances america's made in the decade of fighting al qaeda, it still needs all the old tricks it learned in the day before spy satellites and droughns drones. more and better human intelligence in sources on the ground will result in more accurate targeting. that would be a yemen model that actually worked and a lasting and more effective counterterrorism legacy for mr. obama's second term. gregory johnson from "the new york times." another good article by patrick pool on june 6 of 2012. obama's assassination czar, a relatively unnoticed article, this is from the article, quoting, by associated press reporter kimberly dozer two weeks ago outlining new obama administration policy changes which consolidated power for authorizing drone attacks and assassinations under political appointees within the white house. the article identified -- identifies white house counterterrorism chief, john brennan, as the official assuming the role of obama's de facto assassination czar. raising concerns
support technology that ensures that people who are here are here legally. whether it is that or something like that, there are more people more qualified to speak on that. i would say including an ability for employers to verify the legal status that is better and more comprehensive. >> we tried to do that and failed, but you will still have the underground employers if you have people who are overstating their student visas. my concern -- you have answered this in different variations time and time again. this is a very generous pathway to citizenship. maybe may be we tight unit and find a compromise, and how to avoid creating an incentive for people to keep coming here? that is what my constituents -- and that a big stumbling point. >> you solve the issue that you have in front of you that you improve the ability to see the folks who should not be here and ensure that people do not overstay their visas. >> i say i'm out of time, but i do not see how you do it. how do you track them? >> throwing our hands up is not an option. >> the chair recognizes the gentleman from florida, mr. garcia
of me today about specific programs, submarine programs, different areas of technology and acquisitions, and our superior technology. i said i do not know enough about it. i do not. there are many things i do not know about. if confirmed, i intend to know a lot more than i do. i will have to. but at the same time, i would never think that, as i said earlier, this is about me or that i will be running anything. i will be the leader. i will be responsible. i will be accountable, but i've got to rely on the right teams, right people to bring those to get there. it is accountability and responsibility. i would stop there, if they give you some sense of how i would intend to do this business. >> my theory of leadership is to hire good people and take credit for what they do. >> [laughter] >> you are a guy from nebraska and in the army, so i imagine you do not get up in the morning and think about the navy. i hope to correct that in the next few years, particularly in maine and other parts of the country. there's a multi-year procurement program that is in jeopardy because of the budget situa
-span. president obama will honor the recipients of the national medal of science and national medal of technology and innovation, the highest honors bestowed by the u.s. government upon scientists, engineers, and inventors. you will have it for you later in our program schedule. at the white house, jay carney held his daily briefing, addressing a number of issues including a bombing at the u.s. embassy in turkey today. >> does the president considered the attack on our embassy in turkey to be a terrorist attack? >> that is an excellent question a suicide bombing on the perimeter of an embassy is by definition an act of terror, a terrorist attack. i think this is an incident that has just occurred and i don't want to get ahead of it, is being investigated. we strongly condemn what was a suicide attack against our embassy in ankara, which took place at the embassy's our security perimeter. details are still emerging about what exactly happened, who was responsible. it is clearly an act of terror. it caused -- cost hte life about least one individual, a turkish security guard. we are working with th
technology has been around for 100 years. they are the most popular guns for hunting, target shooting, self-defense. despite this fact, congress banned the manufacture and sale of hundreds of semi-automatic firearms from 1994 through 2004. independent studies, including one from the clinton justice department, approved it had no impact on lowering crime. and when it comes to background checks, let's be honest. they will never be universal because criminals will never submit to them. there are a lot of things that can be done and we ask you to join with us. the nra is made up of millions of americans who support what it is -- what works. the immediate protection for all, not just some, of our school children is what is needed, and swift punishment of criminals who misuse guns in fixing our mental health system. we love our families. we love our country. we believe in freedom. and we are the way -- the millions from all walks of life to take responsibility and protection as a god-given, fundamental american right. >> chief johnson, let me begin with you, sir. in my experience, many criminals
in technology and policy, from this years ces international consumer electronics show. monday night on the communicators on c-span2. >> at age 65, she was the oldest first lady when her husband became president. she never set foot in washington. her husband, benjamin harrison, died one month after his inauguration. meet anna harrison and the other people who served as first lady over 44 administrations. first ladies, influence and image, their public and private lives, interest, and influence on the president. season one begins presidents' day, february 18 at 9 p.m. eastern and pacific. >> the atlantic council hosted a discussion on the conflict in mali and stability in that part of africa. french troop surge continuing their advance into areas recently held by islamist militants. this began last year when the government was overthrown in a military coup. separatist groups in the north began fighting for independence shortly after and gained control of a large part of the country. this is two hours. >> good afternoon. my name is peter, i am the director of the michael africa center
how many we can get. [laughter] >> relating to the new technology. we are caught right now in twin revolutions with politics and jouranlism and one -- journalism and one effects the other. your sense as a long-time political observer, with the impact of the new technology on the politics. >> it turned everything upside down. when i was a young reporter for the "fort worth star telegram." about 10 days out, there would be a whispering campaign that one of the candidates had a girlfriend on the east side. all the girlfriends live on the east side. [laughter] as a reporter, we'd go check it out. if it amounted to anything we may do something. i can't remember if it ever amounted to anything. now, there are no whispering campaigns. if someone has a rumor, someone writes it on a blog and it is out there. we as journalists, we treat them as news tips. we'd never broadcast it unless it was true. not everyone follows the standards of mainstream journalism. the politicians have to decide to i ignore this and hope it goes away. there is an old financial recourse. if i make a mistake and libe
be as a force agile, flexible, quickly deployable and at the cutting edge of technology. that can be an effective force for the future. yet, we can be smaller, but agility, flexibility, the ability to move fast when crisis happens, that's what can distinguish the united states' defense policy. secondly, it was important for us to project power into the pacific and into the middle east. those are the key areas where we've got some serious problems -- north korea, iran. we need to have a power presence in those areas. theuse that's where greatest potential for conflict lies. third, we need to maintain a presence elsewhere in the world, and so what was developed was the idea, an innovative idea of rotational deployments where we could send our forces into countries, latin america, africa, europe, other places to train, to exercise, to work with that country to develop their capabilities, to develop new partnerships, new alliances so that they could become part of this security force for the future. fourthly, we had to maintain the capability to defeat more than one enemy at a time. i
to this position. first, chuck is acutely aware that even in an age of rapid technological advances, our military capability and effectiveness depend on the quality and the morale of the people who serve our nation in uniform, as well as the families who support them. chuck received two purple hearts in vietnam, and he continued to fight for veterans and active duty military personnel. he knows that our people are the strongest assets. second, chuck's experience in vietnam shape his life in perspective. war for chuck hagel is not an abstraction. i am confident that if confirmed, he will ask the hard and smart questions before sending troops into battle. chuck hagel knows that the united states has vital interests that are worth fighting for and dying for. he also knows that war should be a last resort, and that our nation must effectively use all of our tools, not limited only to our military, to protect our important and to protect our vital interests. certainly, mr. chairman, there is a tension in these values, but it is a tension we should welcome in the thought process and in the advice that
phone calls. a look at facial recognition technology. and senator ron wyden talks about the global internet. in 45 minutes, a discussion on the latest unemployment figures. later,
're supporting women entrepreneurs around the world. technology human rights -- i know and not punished here that list and they say, is not all a bit soft? what about the hard stuff? that is a false choice. we need both. i will be the first to proclaimed loudly that america's military might is and must remain the greatest fighting force in the history of the world. i will also make clear that our diplomatic power, the ability to convene our moral suasion -- we will ensure freedom of navigation in all the world's seas. we will go after al qaeda and its wannabes. we will do what is necessary to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. there are limits to what soft power can achieve. there are limits to what hard power can achieve. it is why i have been talking about smart power. look at our approach to two regions undergoing swift changes. america's expanding engagement in the asia-pacific. adapting our force posture is a key element of our strategy. but so is strengthening our alliances through new economic and security arrangements. we have sent marines but have ratified the korea free
the aperture of our engagement. technology. a 21stnot bea first century leader without 21st century tools. i have championed 21st century state-craft. with a center for counterterrorism communications at state. experts and specialists from across the government fluent in arabic, somali use social media to expose al qaeda's abuses including its brutal attacks on muslim civilians. with are leading the effort to defend internet freedom so remains open a reliable for everybody. we're helping human rights activists get online and communicate more safely. the country that built the internet should be leading the fight to protect it from those who would use it as a tool of control. our nonproliferation agenda. negotiating the new start treaty was an example of this at its best. but we also have been working with partners around the world to create a new institution to keep dangerous materials out of the hands of terrorists. we impose crippling sanctions against iran and north korea. enlisted banks and high tech international financial institutions and today the oil tankers sit idle and their curren
clearly changed this debate, not just the last financial crisis but the bursting of the technology bubble in 2001. the pendulum has swung clearly toward a sense in american society that -- in the same way you need police on the streets to keep the streets safe, you need police in the markets in order to enforce rules of fair play in the markets. the question today is how do you calibrate that? how far are you willing to go? it is still early days since the financial crisis and the debate has not been resolved. to make a counterpoint, some conservatives would argue that washington played a role in distorting the markets that went awry. there are elements of truth on both sides. it is the case that fannie mae and freddie mac, two giant mortgage finance firms that played a role in writing the bad mortgages that were written in the housing boom were creations of congress and that the capital requirements for those institutions and the oversight of those institutions was not the same as it was for the banks. at the end of the day, whether you believe in the private sector or you believe in gov
enough common sense with our technology to put something on these drones where if they lose remote- control contact, they automatically self-destruct? we have a good piece of technology that fell into iranian hands. that is about it. thank you. host: albany, georgia. republican caller. good morning. hi, styles. you are on the air. caller: first of all, i am curious how many of the callers wechsler responded have served in the military during wartime or not or lost their lives or bring family members lost their lives due to what we are dealing with in the middle east. i am curious how many of them spent any time in the middle east to know what is going on and understand the enemy we are actually fighting against. it is not a warfare we are typically used to. the drones are not only a good idea, it is an excellent idea. from where i stand. again, i would like to add this as well. the american people need to know that not only are we hunting terrorists, but we actually have military specialist being hunted in our country today. if you do not believe it is true, look in your local arch
spend on high technology and other interventions. as laudan aron said, we spent $2.80 trillion in the united states on health care, way more than any other of the developed countries. there is an interesting thing we found, our ratio between what we spend on health care and what we spend on public health and social programs -- if you klop the ratio in the united states and other countries, the u.s. is an outline. the countries with better outcomes spend left -- spend less on health care and more on public health and social programs. it tells us may be the issue is not how much we are spending -- we are spending tons on help -- but how we are spending it and whether there is a smarter way spending the help of dollars in a way that would actually help us achieve the life expectancy and health outcomes of these other countries are enjoying. the second question she asked is how much simply reflects the fact that we have a large, diverse population in the united states -- racially and ethnically. a lot of poverty. it is well known that health disparities exist in this country and th
technology of hydraulic fracturing. so we've seen this improvements that have really dramatically changed the course of production that we would never have dreamed of. i'm going to close with is that we have an opportunity based on a study to generate millions of jobs, trillions of investment, and billions if not trillions of federal, state, and local revenues. we have the opportunity to do this from nonconvention oil alone. what we have right now is a choice. we can make wise decisions moving forward to develop all of the above resources. or we can repeat some mistakes of the past, in particular the proposals for the gas industry are repeated. and we have potential for more regulation which could slow down the whole process. so we have an opportunity once-in-a-lifetime, i've been analyzing energy for 40 years and we can move forward between what we produce in this country from imports from canada we can become energy self-sufficient. i never would have dreamed that was possible five years ago. thanks very much for your time. i will turn it over. >> thank you. we're going to have bob cost
. american universities in the stem fields, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, would be granted a green card upon graduation. this is adopting an older proposal called the stable act. this is a very good move, relatively small by comparison with the size of the system. it also talks vaguely about removing backlogs. if that is similar to a legislative attempts in the past few years, that would mean removing be per country limitations on highly skilled green card and workers coming in. as the system stands now, only 7% are allowed to come from a single country every year, leading to a long backlog for workers from other countries, sometimes longer than a decade. that would be a big improvement to the system. generally, i think most people agree that you need to have a very good reason to have this reform effort, and i think this should be extended, not just to immigrants who are educated in the u.s., but highly skilled immigrants from other countries. >> lawyers as well? >> some lawyers. he is a lawyer two times over, and i think the u.s. is better by having him here. b
the train. i believe that online education and technology and education, digital learning, really is the wave of the future for school choice. it is not just plunking a few computers in classrooms or buying a smartboard anymore. it is actually connecting kids, whether they're in a school, public school, public charter school, magnet school, or in the home with some of the best teachers around the world via online and blended learning. it can make a difference for so many families. host: our next call comes from dell, dell is an educator. and we want to show a picture of some supporters on the steps of the pennsylvania state capitol in harrisburg in january during the first annual national school choice week. go ahead, dell. caller: yeah, i'm a former educator, i'm in my 70's. i have a question i want to give you first, i want to give you also commentary. question being, how does school choice play into these other countries like india, china, japan, where they have much better success in the schools, for example. give me something about i.i.t., the indian institute of technology,
of the type of technology and military intelligence that has helped the united states. we should not just look at this as a one-way street. the israelis also understand the obligation of helping their american allies. host: this morning, the washington post reflecting on the tenure anniversary of: ofl's -- 10 year anniversary testimony.l's in george w. bush's book, he described the presentation as exhaustive. later, many of the assertions would prove to be inaccurate. at the time, his words reflected the considered judgment and intelligence of the cia at home and around the world. if you look back at what he said 10 years ago, what are the lessons for american foreign policy? guest: i can tell you that the lesson for me was that i made a terrible mistake of believing that speech. of all of the people in the administration, i never believed colin paulo would misrepresent the facts and lead them to believe we should support the argument he laid out. it was the predominant reason why someone like me, who had less inclination to believe anything that dick cheney or george bush had to say about ira
in science, technology and math, stem workers, as there has been silicon valley employers that say we do not have enough of those folks, and those that are forced to leave after they are educated here, which makes no sense. host: this tweet -- common sense immigration reform starts with a double armed wire fence with towers and dogs. the next call comes from rob in edgewater, maryland. caller: thank you. i am green party, but there is not a line for green party. you mentioned nafta in the and's, and in the 1990's the early-2000's, there was a push to break labor unions and a great push for the war on drugs. if you accumulate all of these things, the war on drugs, the breaking of the labor unions, what we have done is created a permanent underclass. of course they want to run here. it is a war zone in those countries, and in this country the wages for average workers -- the one percent are at the top, and the 99% have been struggling along. if people had decent wages, they would not mind more immigration , but the fact is we have not looked out for our own. some at the top want more to co
technology, better barriers, but we are still not there. so we need more. >host: finally, no chance the democrats will make any deal that improves the wave -- wages panics the republicans. guest: that may be a cynical way to look at it. i can tell you there are a number of democrats who want to do this for the right reasons. that reflects the position of those who were in this group. there may be some who wanted just for political purposes, but we will assume the best and move ahead. host: senator jeff flake, republican of arizona, thank you for being here. [captioning performed bynational captioning institute][captions copyright nationalcable satellite corp. 2013]>> tomorrow we talk about al jazeera's new english channel. the inspector general for the troubled asset relief program questions about her criticism of the treasury department for approving excessive pay for executives at firms that received taxpayer bailouts during the financial crisis. we will also discuss a report that concludes that americans die sooner and at higher rates of disease then people in other high income c
technology gets down alongside the product technology. and does not mean you cannot do it in a certain way. i'll never give up on trying to win globally but most products today have this incredible linkage between the design and how it is manufactured. we will purchase $13 billion from small, medium-sized companies. >> when the day setting stories in manufacturing these days is 3d manufacturing. is this over hyped? the founder of one of his thesey's -- one of companies -- >> if you look of a company like ours, we make incredible -- at our core, we are a materials company. we probably, if to the the the common thread between gas turbines, jet engine, locomotive, if the material technologies. that is who we are. and we do unique shapes. in shape of a turbine blade might be the difference in one or two points of fuel burn it and to the way that engine works. that is billions of dollars to our customers. you get a block of something and you weld it and take the scra p, that is how you make those parts. preprinting allows you to make the product right the first time from the car up c do not have a
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